Northland Pet Lodge

Outdoor Movies at the Crosslake Campground!

The US Army Corps of Engineers – Crosslake Campground will be the site for outdoor movies in Crosslake this summer!  Bring a blanket or lawn chairs and enjoy a different family friendly movie each month.  Movies like The Lorax, Ice Age, A Christmas Story and The Great Outdoors are all on the schedule (subject to change).

There is no charge to attend and water & popcorn will be provided too!  All donations are appreciated and will be matched dollar for dollar by the Crosslake Ideal Lions.  100% of the proceeds will be used to enhance the Christmas lights on the Dam and US Army Corps properties.

Movie dates are Thursday, June 18 ,Thursday, July 23, Thursday, Aug 20, Friday, Sept. 25 and begin at dusk.

http://www.recreation.gov/camping/crosslake-campground/r/campgroundDetails.do?contractCode=NRSO&parkId=73141

 

AKC Canine Good Citizenship Test offered at the Lodge

On Tuesday May 19th Northland Pet Lodge hosted a American Kennel Club Canine Good Citizenship (CGC) test at their facility in Crosslake, MN. 8 handlers and their dogs participated in the CGC test and all 8 successfully passed the test. All 8 handlers had taken the Basic Obedience and Advanced Obedience Classes offered by Northland Pet Lodge.  Congratulations to the following participants; Kathy Wolleat & Charlie, Kris Hanson & Annie, Jill Andersen & Diesel, Kiri McVenes & Jaz…, Sara Olson & Winchester, Dennis Swan & Lucy, Teresa Gregory & Frolic, and Dennis Swan & Izzy.

The Canine Good Citizen (CGC) Program is designed to reward dogs who have good manners at home and in the community. The Canine Good Citizen Program is a two-part program that stresses responsible pet ownership for owners and basic good manners for dogs. All dogs who pass the 10-step CGC test may receive a certificate from the American Kennel Club.The AKC’s CGC Program is recognized as the gold standard for dog behavior. In CGC, dogs who pass the 10 step CGC test earn a certificate and/or the official AKC CGC title. All dogs, including both purebred and mixed breed dogs are welcome to participate in the AKC’s Canine Good Citizen (CGC) Program. Dogs must be old enough to have received necessary immunizations such as rabies vaccines. Owners will sign the Responsible Dog Owners Pledge attesting to having the dog under the routine care of a veterinarian who will work with the owner to determine an appropriate plan and schedule for vaccines and other health care procedures. For more information about Puppy Classes, Basic Obedience Classes, Advanced Obedience Classes, and Canine Good Citizenship testing please contact Northland Pet Lodge at 218.692.4364 or Info@NorthlandPetLodge.com

Got Allergies!

Just like humans, pets can become susceptible to both food and environmental allergies throughout their lifetime. Feeding pets limited-ingredient diets, which reduce allergens in food, can eliminate allergic reactions. Environmental allergies such as tree pollen or dust or mold, can be problematic to manage in pets. A pet will react to these allergens by increased scratching, sneezing, vomiting and snoring caused by an inflamed throat. Simple solutions such as keeping grass cut short along with vacuuming and bathing more frequently help reduce the symptoms. Supplements can help, to; salmon oil and probiotics boost the pet’s immune system. Stop in today and talk to one of our Professional Pet Lover’s if your pet is suffering form allergies. We have some great food and supplements that will help relieve your pet’s allergy issues.

February is Doggie Dental Month

Providing your pet with a healthy diet, brushing regularly and using chew toys can greatly increase oral health. Developing good habits early can decrease the risk of dental diseases later on in your pet’s life. Stop in today and talk with one of our professional pet lovers about all the healthy foods, treats, and supplements to help keep your pet’s pearly whites clean and healthy.

8 Reasons to Adopt A Senior Dog

Dogs that usually have trouble getting adopted are the ones with a little more grey on their muzzles. Our bias earns these dogs the tag of being “less adoptable.”

Dogs that are seven years or older are regarded as seniors.  Unfortunately, dogs five or older have a harder time getting adopted.  Most people prefer adopting puppies. Puppies, however, can be a handful, and many people don’t realize how much more effort goes into training a puppy.

Adopting a senior dog can prove to be an enriching experience for both you and your family. Here are eight reasons for adopting a senior dog:

1. They are Accustomed to Human Routine 

Adopting a senior dog could mean that you spend less time training the dog and more time bonding with it. They are often experienced and trained to obey basic commands like sit, stay, and the all-important no.  A senior dog will not be as energetic and frisky as its younger counterpart, but that could be a good thing if you are looking for a more sedate companion.

 

2. What You See Is What You Get 

When adopting a dog for a family, it is important to know the nature and personality of the dog. Does he do well with children? How is he with strangers? Will he be loyal or aggressive? These are important  questions to ask.  A senior dog already has his personality established, which you can gauge with a short walk outside, and a few visits to the shelter

  1. They Cost Less 

An older dog, as opposed to a young dog or puppy, will cost less in adoption fees quite simply because there is less demand for them. But once you get one home you’ll realize what a great deal you have landed. Spend the cash you save on getting some delicious treats for your pooch or some toys that will help him acclimatize.

  1. They Are Always up for a Cuddle

 Senior dogs are usually not as energetic as younger ones. They tend to enjoy their time spent lazing on the couch, in front of the TV, or just sprawled out under the sun on your veranda. If they find you in bed with a book, do not be surprised if they snuggle up to you for a nap. These dogs, to a great extent, are self-sufficient and have little need for round-the-clock engagement like puppies do. That is not to say that they won’t need exercise, but instead of a power walk they will not mind a long stroll.

  1. No More Surprises to Clean

 Older dogs are usually housebroken.

  1. Train Them with Ease

 Have you ever heard the saying, you can’t teach an old dog new tricks? Well, that seems to not hold true for dogs as much as it does for humans. Older dogs have considerably longer attention spans and can learn faster than puppies or younger dogs.

  1. They Are Loyal to a Fault

 When you adopt a senior dog, he not only looks up at you as his companion but as someone who gave him a better life. This is one bond that is not easily broken.

  1. You Can Save A Life

 Adopting a dog from a shelter makes you a life saver.

When you go to the shelter to adopt a dog, try to go in the middle of the week. Most shelters are busy with visitors on weekends making the animals anxious and loud. If you want a better idea of the personality of the dog take him out for a short walk. Do not make prolonged eye-contact with him. Talk to him, and sit with him so that he can get used to your presence and scent.

When you bring your new friend home, you will be glad you did.

By Nicola Reynor

– See more at: http://petnewsandviews.com/2014/08/8-reasons-to-adopt-a-senior-dog/#sthash.exI5Bbep.dpuf

6 Back to School Tips for Your Pet

The end of summer means an empty house for many families. While parents may enjoy a break from the kids, it may be a different story for our dogs. Dr. Ernie Ward shares tips on how you can make the transition from summer to school easier for your pets.

1. Transition Time About a week before the kids return to school, begin getting your dog used to their absence. This is best accomplished by leaving your dog home for short trips. Ideally, leave them inside early in the morning to simulate school time. You only need to leave them for thirty minutes or so. The idea is to get them accustomed to the fact that long, lazy summer mornings are coming to an end. Also, start getting out the lunchboxes and other items your dog associates with leaving for school in the morning. The idea is to de-sensitize them to any anxiety-producing cues prior to school starting. Do this several times a day and your dog’s nervousness will begin to diminish.

2. Break Out the Crate For indoor dogs that will be spending several hours alone, a dog crate may be your best bet. A crate is not a punishment device; it is a play pen. Placing your dog in a crate should be thought of as putting a toddler in a play pen or crib. The purpose is to prevent your dog from getting into accidents and injuring himself. In addition, the security of having one’s own space is comforting to many dogs. Be sure to leave food or a treat, fresh water, a blanket and favorite toy. Try to come home at lunch to take your dog out for a break. The ideal crate size should be just big enough for them to comfortably stand up, turn around and stretch out. Rotate the toys you leave and use those that you can stuff with vegetables or dog food to keep your dog engaged while you’re away. In many areas doggie daycare is an excellent alternative to “home alone.”

3. Turn on Some Tunes Whenever your dog is left alone, the sound of human voices or music can be soothing. I recommend leaving slow (50 to 60 beats per minute) and soothing music playing whenever your pet is left alone.

4. Pass on the Piddle Pads Many people think that if they leave their dog indoors, they should leave out a piddle pad. I don’t recommend putting down newspaper, training pads or other substances for your dog to urinate on except in very special situations. While you may think you’re telling your dog to urinate on a piddle pad in an emergency, your dog interprets this as it’s okay to tinkle on your tile. The goal with house-training is that your dog doesn’t go to the bathroom in the house–period. This is another excellent reason for using a dog crate.

5. Avoid Anxiety Changes in routine can also lead to anxiety in many dogs. Some dogs will experience separation anxiety or become frightened by loud noises or sudden thunderstorms. In addition to great pharmacologic treatments to help relax your pet during these stressful times, there are non-prescription remedies that may help. Rescue Remedy, valerian, melatonin, SAM-e, fish oil, dog-appeasing pheromone (DAP) and other natural products may also help some dogs and cats. Gradual desensitization using storm recordings work remarkably well for most pets. One of the most overlooked treatments is to increase the amount of exercise your dog receives. Several studies have shown increasing aerobic activity to as little as 30 minutes a day reduces the signs of separation anxiety in dogs.

Enriching the environment with a constantly rotating selection of interesting and interactive toys is also helpful in making your dog feel at home when he’s alone.

Talk with your veterinarian about how to calm your best buddy with an anxiety problem. There’s no reason anyone should have to cower in a closet or destroy the furniture to get relief.

6. Quality Time Counts Most With school back in session, your dog may not get as much time playing with your family as during the care-free days of summer. If this is the case at your house, be sure to make the most of the time you have with your pet. Long walks at the park, lounging around on the couch, whatever it takes to re-connect at the end of a busy week. Remember that even though your dog wasn’t at work or school all day, he still needs time to unwind. As the days grow shorter, be sure to find time to walk your dog daily and enjoy this unique relationship.

– See more at: http://petnewsandviews.com/2010/08/6-back-to-school-tips-for-your-pet/#sthash.5ElJddcH.dpuf

Free Nights of Lodging!!!

Want your pet(s) to enjoy a free night of lodging?

Refer another pet owner to board their pet(s) with us and you will receive a free night of lodging and they will receive 10% off their first stay! There is no limit on the number of free nights you can receive, the more pet lovers you tell the more FREE nights you receive.

Referral cards are available on our website, at the Lodge or click the link below.

http://www.northlandpetlodge.com/lodging/referral-program/

 

 

 

Summer Dog Safety Tips from the American Kennel Club.

Hot weather can make us all uncomfortable, and it poses special risks for your dog. Keep the following safety concerns in mind as the temperature rises, and follow our tips to keep your dog cool.

Heat Hazards

 

If your dog is outside on a hot day, make sure he has a shady spot to rest in. Doghouses are not good shelter during the summer as they can trap heat. You may want to fill a child’s wading pool with fresh water for your dog to cool off in.

Never leave your dog in a closed vehicle on a hot day. The temperature inside a car can rise to over 100 degrees in a matter of minutes.

Always provide plenty of cool, fresh water.

Avoid strenuous exercise on extremely hot days. Take walks in the early mornings or evenings, when the sun’s heat is less intense.

Try to avoid prolonged exposure to hot asphalt or sand, which can burn your dog’s paws.

Dogs that are brachycephalic (short-faced), such as Bulldogs, Boxers, Japanese Chins, and Pekingese, have an especially hard time in the heat because they do not pant as efficiently as longer-faced dogs. Keep your brachycephalic dog inside with air-conditioning.

General Health

 

Make sure your dog’s vaccinations are up to date, especially since dogs tend to stay outdoors longer and come into contact with other animals more during the summer months.

Keep dogs off of lawns that have been chemically treated or fertilized for 24 hours (or according to package instructions), and away from potentially toxic plants and flowers.

Keep your dog well-brushed and clean.

Fleas and ticks, and the mosquitos which carry heartworm disease, are more prevalent in warmer months. Ask your veterinarian for an effective preventive to keep these parasites off your dog. The AKC Pet Healthcare Plan can help with the cost of providing quality healthcare, including preventive medicine, throughout your dog’s life.

Beach Tips

 

Make sure your dog has a shady spot to rest in and plenty of fresh water.

Dogs, especially those with short hair, white fur, and pink skin, can sunburn. Limit your dog’s exposure during the day and apply sunblock to his ears and nose 30 minutes before going outside.

Check with a lifeguard for daily water conditions. Dogs are easy targets for sea lice and jellyfish.

Running on the sand is strenuous exercise. A dog that is out of shape can easily pull a tendon or ligament, so keep a check on your dog’s activity.

Do not let your dog drink seawater; the salt will make him sick.

Salt and other minerals in ocean water can damage your dog’s coat, so rinse him off at the end of the day.

Not all beaches permit dogs; check local ordinances before heading out.

Water Safety

 

Most dogs enjoy swimming, but some cannot swim, and others may hate the water. Be conscious of your dog’s preferences and skills before trying to make him swim.

If you’re swimming for the first time with your dog, start in shallow water and coax him in by calling his name. Encourage him with toys or treats. Or, let him follow another experienced dog he is friendly with.

Never throw your dog into the water.

If your dog begins to paddle with his front legs, lift his hind legs and help him float. He should quickly catch on and keep his back end up.

Don’t let your dog overdo it; swimming is very hard work and he may tire quickly.

If swimming at the ocean, be careful of strong tides.

If you have your own pool, make sure your dog knows where the stairs or ladder are located. Be sure that pool covers are firmly in place; dogs have been known to slip in under openings in the covers and drown.

Never leave your dog unattended in water.

Travel

 

By Air – Many airlines will not ship animals during summer months due to dangers caused by hot weather. Some will only allow dogs to fly in the early morning or in the evening. Check with your airlines for specific rules.

If you do ship a dog, put icepacks or an ice blanket in the dog’s crate. (Two-liter soft drink bottles filled with water and frozen work well.) Provide a container of fresh water, as well as a container of frozen water that will thaw over the course of the trip.

By Car – Keep your dog cool in the car by putting icepacks in his crate. Make sure the crate is well ventilated.

Put a sunshade on your car windows.

Bring along fresh water and a bowl, and a tarp or tent so you can set up a shady spot when you stop. Keep a spray bottle filled with water to spritz on your dog to cool him down.

By RV – A dog’s safety should not depend on the air conditioning and generator systems in an RV or motor home. These devices can malfunction, with tragic results.

If you leave your dog in an RV with the generator running, check it often or have a neighbor monitor it. Some manufacturers have devices that will notify you if the generator should malfunction.

Never leave an RV or motor home completely shut up, even if the generator and AC are running. Crack a window or door or run the exhaust fan.

Never, ever leave a dog unattended in a vehicle in the summer months. Heatstroke and death can occur within minutes in warm temperatures.

Heatstroke

 

Heatstroke can be the serious and often fatal result of a dog’s prolonged exposure to excessive heat. Below are the signs of heatstroke and the actions you should take if your dog is overcome.

Early Stages:

  • Heavy panting.
  • Rapid breathing.
  • Excessive drooling.
  • Bright red gums and tongue.
  • Standing 4-square, posting or spreading out in an attempt to maintain balance.

 

Advanced Stages:

  • White or blue gums.
  • Lethargy, unwillingness to move.
  • Uncontrollable urination or defecation.
  • Labored, noisy breathing.
  • Shock.

 

If your dog begins to exhibit signs of heatstroke, you should immediately try to cool the dog down:

  • Apply rubbing alcohol to the dog’s paw pads.
  • Apply ice packs to the groin area.
  • Hose down with water.
  • Allow the dog to lick ice chips or drink a small amount of water.
  • Offer Pedialyte to restore electrolytes.

Check your dog’s temperature regularly during this process. Once the dog’s temperature has stabilized at between 100 to 102 degrees, you can stop the cool-down process.

If you cannot get the dog cooled down and you begin to see signs of advanced heatstroke, take the dog to the veterinarian immediately.

The 25 Most Popular Breeds In the USA in 2013.

1. Labrador Retriever

2.German Shepard

3.Golden Retriever

4. Beagle

5. Bulldog

6. Yorkshire Terrier

7. Boxer

8. Poodle

9. Rottweiler

10. Dachshund

11. French Bulldog

12. Doberman Pinscher

13. German Short-haired Pointer

14. Siberian Husky

15. Shih Tzu

16. Great Dane

17. Miniature Schnauzer

18. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

19. Pomeranian

20. Australian Shepard

21. Shetland Sheepdog

22. Chihuahua

23. Boston Terrier

24. Permbroke Welsh Corgi

25. Havanese

 

 

Business Hours
Monday-Saturday: 8:00am - 5:30pm
Sunday AM: 8:00am-12:00pm
Sunday PM: 4:30pm-5:30pm

Phone: 218.692.4364
Toll Free: 866.721.0505
Fax: 218.975.2016
E-mail: stay*AT*northlandpetlodge.com
Address: 34420 County Road 3
Crosslake, MN 56442

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